Reflection on Week 1 Lessons

NR 500: Reflection on Week 1 Lessons

Reflection on Week 1 Lessons

The most important concepts I learned in week one include the competencies of the Master’s-prepared nurse, the framework for professional nursing practice, and the roles of the Master’s-prepared nurse. I learned that MSN nurses build on the competencies gained in the BSN program. MSN nurses must demonstrate a deeper understanding of nursing and the related sciences needed to fully evaluate, design, implement, and evaluate nursing care (AACN, 2011). Besides, I have realized that nurses who gain the competencies outlined in the AACN Essentials of Master’s Education in Nursing have advanced nursing knowledge and higher-level leadership skills for improving health outcomes. This has significant value for the current and emerging roles of MSN nurses in healthcare delivery and design.

The concepts are essential because MSN students learn that they are expected to demonstrate a broad knowledge and practice expertise that should build on and expand their BSN nursing practice. They also gain insight that they should have a deeper understanding of the nursing discipline to engage in higher-level practice and leadership in various settings and commit to lifelong learning. The concepts will prepare me for my future role as an MSN-prepared nurse since they have enlightened me on the competencies I should demonstrate before graduating. I can apply the framework for professional nursing practice to provide healthcare that is holistic, person-centered, and care-focused (DeNisco & Barker, 2015). Besides, the concepts will guide me in demonstrating the skills and attitudes needed to meet the professional competencies that I need as an MSN-prepared advanced practice nurse.

 

 

References

American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2011). The essentials of master’s education in nursing.  https://www.aacnnursing.org/Portals/42/Publications/MastersEssentials11

DeNisco, S. M. & Barker, A. M. (2015). Advanced practice nursing: Essential knowledge for the profession (3rd ed.).  Jones & Bartlett Learning.

 

Week 1: Reading

 

American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2011). The essentials of master’s education in nursing. https://www.aacnnursing.org/Portals/42/Publications/MastersEssentials11.pdf

Chamberlain University. (2018). Philosophy and framework. https://www.chamberlain.edu/docs/default-source/academics-admissions/catalog.pdf

Clark, L., Casey, D., & Morris, S. (2015). The value of master’s degrees for registered nursesLinks to an external site.British Journal of Nursing, 24(6), 328-334. https://doi-org.chamberlainuniversity.idm.oclc.org/10.12968/bjon.2015.24.6.328

DeNisco, S. M. & Barker, A. M. (2015). Advanced practice nursing: Essential knowledge for the profession (3rd ed.).  Jones & Bartlett Learning.

  • Chapter 1 Introduction to the Role of Advanced Practice Nursing
  • Master’s-Prepared Competencies
  • Introduction
  • This is a very exciting time in nursing as we are currently experiencing a transformation of nursing practice. The role of the master’s-prepared advanced practice nurse is evolving in response to the changing healthcare environment and delivery system. A master’s education equips nurses with valuable knowledge and skills to lead change, promote health, and elevate care in various roles and settings (American Association of Colleges of Nursing [AACN], 2011). Several professional nursing guidelines have been established to help guide the transformation of nursing practice. For example, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Essentials of Master’s Education in Nursing, the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) Nurse Practitioner (NP) Competencies, and the National League for Nurses (NLN) provide guidelines for graduate nursing education. All three professional nursing organizations have developed frameworks to guide graduate nursing education curricula that are consistent with the Initiative on the Future of Nursing call for the transformation of nursing practice (Institute of Medicine, 2010). Likewise, the Chamberlain University (CU) masters of science nursing (MSN) program delivers a curriculum that incorporates professional nursing educational guidelines to help produce competent graduate nurses in a variety of advanced practice specialty areas that include both direct and indirect health care settings. The CU MSN program provides an expanded perspective on the roles and essential competencies of master’s-prepared nurse practice in the 21st century. As a master’s-prepared advanced practice nurse of the 21st century, you must have a diverse set of knowledge, skills, and attitudes that foster and facilitate leadership in complex adaptive systems.
  • Reflection Box
  • Think about the role of the master’s-prepared nurse in the 21st century. What skills and abilities must the MSN nurse possess to be an effective healthcare professional? At the end of this course, you will reflect on your answer to see if your opinions have changed.
  • Framework for Professional Nursing Practice
  • When students enter the classroom, they are provided with a Syllabus that discusses the knowledge that they are expected to gain as a result of taking the course. Students who read through the assignments often cannot help but wonder why the professor selected certain content or assignments to be included in the course. There are professional standards that serve as the framework and define the expectations of the curriculum of a nursing program. There are several documents that define the critical outcomes of graduate study in nursing: The Essentials of Master’s Education in Nursing (AACN, 2011), the NONPF NP Competencies, the Graduate Competencies (NLN, 2012), and the Chamberlain College of Nursing (2016) Masters of Science in Nursing Conceptual Framework.
  • Image Description
  • The goal of professional nursing guidelines is to serve as an outline of the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that are expected of all graduates of a master’s in nursing program. The graduate curriculum is designed to build upon the knowledge of the baccalaureate or entry-level of practice (AACN, 2011) and to provide graduates with the knowledge needed to support practice in a complex, fluid, and dynamic health care setting with an emphasis on quality and safe care (National League for Nursing, 2012). Regardless of the selected focus of graduate study, the MSN nursing student must demonstrate the skills and attitudes necessary to meet the professional competencies of a master’s-prepared advanced practice nurse. Professionally competent is also a prerequisite attribute of the Person-Centred Nursing Framework that addresses the importance of having the right knowledge, skills, and attitude to deliver holistic care (McCormack & McCance, 2017). This framework and holistic care will be explored in upcoming weeks of this course.
  • According to the AACN (2011), the nurse who earns a master’s degree will be accountable for quality-care outcomes and integration of care throughout a healthcare system; providing leadership and mentorship, collaborating and developing interdisciplinary teams, devising innovative measures to provide care, and aiding in the transition of evidence into the workplace setting. Additionally, as stated by the NLN (2012), master’s-prepared nurses are expected to perform as leaders, scholars, and members of interprofessional teams in the advancement of the nursing profession.
  • Literature supports advanced education for nursing with noted benefits related to patient care (Gerard, Kazer, Babington, & Quell, 2014). According to Clark, Casey, and Morris (2015), evidence suggests that nurses who’ve engaged in postgraduate study may have skills such as effective leadership, complex problem-solving, change management, and relationship building, making them a good fit for today’s complex healthcare environment.
  • Reflection Box
  • Critical thinking is a buzzword that is heard and expected at all levels of nursing. It is not a new concept to nursing practice; critical thinking has permeated nursing literature for the last 30 years. Healthcare delivery is a collaborative effort that involves scholarly dialogue with other disciplines, as well as challenging each other’s perspective on practice. Master’s-prepared nurses have improved critical thinking skills that can be utilized in leadership roles and used to challenge poor practices (Clark, Casey, & Morris, 2015) and influence positive change.
  • The master’s-prepared nurse also appreciates the interrelationships of ethical and legal issues, financial sustainability, and the translation of evidence-based research into practice (AACN, 2011). Nurses prepared at the master’s level must also possess the ability to utilize technology and engage and lead interprofessional teams to improve healthcare delivery and health outcomes (Gerard et al., 2014) with a sustained focus on quality and safety.
  • Roles of the Master’s-Prepared Nurse
  • As discussed in this lesson, the profession of nursing is transforming based on changes in healthcare. The Institute of Medicine (2010) issued a statement in the landmark Future of Nursing Report calling for nurses to work to the full extent of their education and scope of practice. Master’s-prepared nurses take on many different roles in a variety of healthcare and healthcare-related settings. Master’s-prepared nurses are educated to practice in a variety of direct and indirect practice settings, including administration, education, acute care, and informatics, among others (AACN, 2011).

 

 

References

American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2011). The essentials of master’s education in nursing. https://www.aacnnursing.org/Portals/42/Publications/MastersEssentials11.pdf

Chamberlain College of Nursing (2016). Chamberlain College of Nursing Masters of Science I Nursing conceptual framework. https://www.chamberlain.edu/docs/default-source/academics-admissions/catalog.pdf

Clark, L., Casey, D., & Morris, S. (2015). The value of master’s degrees for registered nurses. British Journal of Nursing, 24(6), 328-334. https://doi.org/10.12968/bjon.2015.24.6.328

Gerard, S. O., Kazer, M. W., Babington, L., & Quell, T. T. (2014). Past, present, and future trends of master’s education in nursing. Journal of Professional Nursing, 30(4), 326-332. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.profnurs.2014.01.005

Institute of Medicine. (2011). The future of nursing: Leading change, advancing health. The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/12956.

McCormack, B. & McCance, T. (2017). Person-centred practice in nursing and health care. Theory and practice (2nd ed.).  Wiley Blackwell.

National League for Nursing. (2012). Outcomes and competencies for graduates of practical/vocational, diploma, associate degree, baccalaureate, master’s, practice doctorate, and research doctorate programs in nursing. http://www.nln.org/professional-development-programs/competencies-for-nursing-education/nln-competencies-for-graduates-of-nursing-programs

 

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