ASTHMA AND STEPWISE MANAGEMENT NURS 6521

ASTHMA AND STEPWISE MANAGEMENT NURS 6521

ASTHMA AND STEPWISE MANAGEMENT NURS 6521

Asthma is a chronic, inflammatory disease which affects the airways. It is associated with various symptoms such as wheezing, difficulty in breathing, chest pain, and cyanosis in severe cases. It is very prevalent in America where 22 million people are affected. The situation raises hospitalization levels to more than 497,000 annually (Kirenga et al., 2018). With such a high number, the country is significantly affected both economically and socially. Many children missed school days due to asthma and some caregivers are also forced to leave work to take care of their sick children. As productivity of the country lowers, a lot of money is used in managing the disease (Rothe et al., 2018). However, treatment options have been improved to address the situation.

Both quick-relief and long control medicines are used in treating asthma. Long-term control medicines (also called controller medicines or maintenance medicines). Long-acting beta-adrenergic (LABA) is one of the quick relief medication used. The LABAs help in providing long-term control of symptoms (Kirenga et al., 2018). Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are commonly used as anti-inflammatory drugs because they reduce inflammation caused by a vast diversity of inflammatory mediators (Yawn & Han, 2017). Rothe et al. (2018) highlight omalizumab (Xolair) as the most common Immuno-modulators used to prevent the binding of IgE to its receptor and in turn, inhibit IgE-mediated asthma from cascading before it begins.

STEP 1. Step one and two are recommended for all ages. In asthma treatment, inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are commonly used as anti-inflammatory drugs because they reduce inflammation caused by a vast diversity of inflammatory mediators (Yawn & Han, 2017). STEP 2. Referrals can be considered for ages between 0-4 (White et al., 2018). This treatment is recommended for patients who show no improvement in step one. The intensity of the medications are increased, and other treatment options are introduced to address the problem. According to Yawn & Han (2017), leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRAs) are introduced as the alternative category of drugs because they help in blocking leukotrienes from binding to the proinflammatory cells in the airways. Most commonly used LTRAs are montelukast, which is effective in allergic asthma.

ASTHMA AND STEPWISE MANAGEMENT NURS 6521

STEP 3. According to Yawn and Han (2017), this step applies for ages above 12 years. At this stage, either the ICS dose is increased, or a long-acting beta-adrenergic (LABA) is added. The LABAs help in providing long-term control of symptoms (Kirenga et al., 2018). Some of the most commonly used combinations of LABAs and ICS (ICS/LABA) are fluticasone + salmeterol (available as a dry powder inhaler) and formoterol + budesonide (available as an HFA inhaler) (Yawn & Han, 2017). STEP 4. Applies for ages above 12 years. Also, patients who experience recurring severe exacerbations requiring ED visits, oral prednisone, or hospitalizations should be considered for this step. The same applies for patient of ages between 5 and 11.

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STEP 5. Applies for ages above 12 years. For ages between 5-11 years, Rothe et al. (2018) recommends a High-dose inhaled steroid plus long-acting beta-agonist. Alternative can be a High-dose inhaled steroid plus leukotriene blocker. Rothe et al. (2018) highlight omalizumab (Xolair) as the most common Immuno-modulators used to prevent the binding of IgE to its receptor and in turn, inhibit IgE-mediated asthma from cascading before it begins. STEP 6. Applies for ages above 12 years. For age 5-11 years, a High-dose inhaled steroid plus long-acting beta-agonist are preferred. A combination of High-dose inhaled steroid, either long-acting beta-agonist or leukotriene blocker, oral steroid is preferred for age 0-4.

In 2007, the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) published its third report, which reinforced the guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma. According to Rothe et al. (2018), the Expert Panel recommends that asthma therapy should be aimed at maintaining control of the disease with the least amount of medication which, in turn, minimizes the risks for adverse effects. The stepwise approach increases or decreases the dose administered and also changes them and their frequency till the best medication and with its best amount and frequency of dosage is established. Efforts are focused on suppressing inflammation over the long term and preventing exacerbations (Yokoyama & Yokoyama, 2019).

REFERENCES

uKirenga, B. J., Schwartz, J. I., de Jong, C., van der Molen, T., & Okot-Nwang, M. (2015). Guidance on the diagnosis and management of asthma among adults in resource limited settings. African health sciences, 15(4), 1189-1199.

uRothe, T., Spagnolo, P., Bridevaux, P. O., Clarenbach, C., Eich-Wanger, C., Meyer, F., & Sauty, A. (2018). Diagnosis and management of asthma–the swiss guidelines. Respiration, 95(5), 364-380.

uYawn, B. P., & Han, M. K. (2017, November). Practical considerations for the diagnosis and management of asthma in older adults. In Mayo Clinic Proceedings (Vol. 92, No. 11, pp. 1697-1705). Elsevier.

uWhite, J., Paton, J. Y., Niven, R., & Pinnock, H. (2018). Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma: a look at the key differences between BTS/SIGN and NICE. Thorax, 73(3), 293-297.

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